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Shallot
Location: South Texas
Age: 12 yrs
Sex: Female
Weight: 24 lbs
Kids: Yes - Dog Savvy, over 8
Cats: No
Dogs: Yes - see below
Fenced yard: Preferred
Adoption Fee: $350
"She really deserves all the love she can stand. She's an incredibly sweet old lady who likes to push her head into a good ear scratch. Seeing her bald nub wagging is priceless. She has even started to jump when I come home, which is pretty impressive at her age. She's the perfect low key Frenchie who just needs some TLC."

Shallot is an older dog and must not be allowed to jump on or off the furniture.

Shallot must remain on daily Proin and cranberry chews to support urinary health and she must take Dasuquin for joint health. Shallot has a small mass on her tail that must be monitored. Lab results from 11.28.2017 shows slightly elevated ALT which needs to be regularly monitored (ALT=Alanine aminotransferase which is a liver enzyme and can indicate a variety of things). She also had elevated Microalbuminaria, which can be an early sign of kidney disease, so she should have routine labs.



Sweet Shallot has made her way on over to the available page. Shallot came to FBRN because her former owners claimed this girl had a downright embarrassing problem for a senior lady. It was believed she was incontinent, but after she got to FBRN it was found she was not! Thank goodness that rumor was squashed.

The good news is that Shallot doesn't have any allergies, no special diets, and nothing extremely limiting. This girl is a bit past her prime, so there shouldn't be any competitions to see how far she can jump off the furniture. Shallot does get a cranberry chew once a day, dasaquin once a day, and prion daily. These items help to support her urinary health and joints. Besides that, the normal medication to keep away the parasites (heartworms). Otherwise there is some monitoring that needs to take place for items that could become a problem. Shallot has a small mass on her tail that should be monitored. Her lab results showed slightly elevated ALT which needs to be regularly monitored. She also had elevated Microalbuminaria, which can be an early sign of kidney disease, so routine labs are important.

Shallot has previously lived with children and would be fine around them. Should there be children in the forever home that she is looking for, they should be dog-savvy and old enough to understand that Shallot is not a fan of being picked up and they should be gentle with her. Frenchies are almost irresistible to children, who love to pick them up, and Shallot just can't risk being dropped--plus she just doesn't like it and we don't know what could happen if she is picked up. Cats are a no, as it is unknown if Shallot has ever previously experienced the company of a feline. Shallot would do fine with other dogs in the house. It should be noted that since she is an older lady and accustomed to her ways, any future fur siblings would need to be of similar size to Shallot and non-dominant. In true female Frenchie fashion, Shallot likes to boss around other dogs so her fur siblings should be fine with her occasionally calling the shots. It should be noted that Shallot will need slow introductions and this is not a negotiable process for her. If these are not followed it will lead to integration issues with her and her new pack. We're serious about this. We've had a number of dogs returned because the adopters wouldn't follow the slow introductions protocol.

Shallot is a low key lady who likes to lounge around. She will come for ear rubs and prance to the door to meet you. She has a lovely coat that is shiny--with the exception of her bald tail (please don't mention it to her; she's never seen it). She has warmed up to lying in bed and snuggling with her humans. She has no interest in toys, but is a lady who loves her treats and food. Shallot doesn't care to roam and explore the back yard but would prefer a walk to do her business. She has no qualms about doing her business wherever it pleases her. Any potential forever home must be alright with the fact that they might see her do her business on a deck instead of the grass. Shallot should be let out frequently as she isn't keen on alerting her humans that she has to go. However, she is house broken when she's taken out regularly.

Shallot does have reactions to animals that she encounters when on a walk. She will get fired up if she happens to see a deer, frog, dog, or some other creature. So the hustle and bustle of city life where dog walking, surrounded by tons of other canines as the main form of exercise and potty breaks, could prove problematic for her.

This girl has no issues with resource guarding or aggression. She doesn't enjoy having her ears cleaned or nails trimmed but does behave like a proper lady when her humans believe this needs to be done. 

The ideal home for Shallot would be one in which someone was home that could take her out multiple times a day. A first time Frenchie owner would be just fine, as she is an easy dog apart from her daily outings she enjoys. Shallot could do well in any type of home, but would prefer to have one with not a lot of stairs unless she can be carried down them. Shallot could adjust to being an office dog as long as she would get out frequently and only submissive dogs were around.

Shallot's foster mom had this to say about her:"She really deserves all the love she can stand. She's an incredibly sweet old lady who likes to push her head into a good ear scratch. Seeing her bald nub wagging is priceless. She has even started to jump when I come home, which is pretty impressive at her age. She's the perfect low key Frenchie who just needs some TLC."

If you think that you can provide Shallot all of the things her sweet old heart desires, then all you need to do is fill out an application and be ready to pick her up if you are selected. She'd love nothing more than to provide someone with sweet Frenchie snuggles.

FBRN does not ship dogs as cargo. Except in rare or unusual cases, adopters are expected to pick up their dogs from their foster family. In rare or unusual cases, FBRN may be able to assist in transporting a dog to a volunteer near the adopter's home, but the expense of transporting the dog must be the responsibility of the adopting party.

FBRN dogs are in foster care in people's private homes. For the foster families' safety, we do not disclose specific locations, and we don't set up meet and greets prior to applications. For detailed information about the dogs in our care, please read the extensive bios on each dog.

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Shallot, Mature Frenchies rock! Love, Pork and Beans.

Love from @atticusdafrenchie

With love from Gemini